Pschology dating

As a psychologist, I have always found the concept of speed dating fascinating.

In an attempt to cope with the large amount of information and potential choices that we are presented with on a daily basis, we tend to rely on so-called “heuristics” (rules of thumb) that help guide our decision making.

In essence, heuristics are decision-making tools that save effort by ignoring some information; and thus, their essential function is to reduce and simplify the processing of cues and information from our environment. In particular, prior research by Lenton and Francesconi suggests that when the number of potential speed-dating partners goes up, people tend to increasingly rely on heuristics in their decision making strategies.

Other research has shown that more choices can cause people to avoid decisions and generally lead them to be less satisfied.

Have you ever had trouble trying to decide what brand of candy to buy in the supermarket?

It is not that surprising that our decision making system breaks down when the human brain is confronted with too many options.

Similar evidence is found in other non-human animals.

Read on and learn how to handle opposite sex friendships! How do people end up in the “friend zone”, facing unrequited love?

Why won’t some friends-with-benefits ever commit and “make it official”? What will keep you in their good graces…and out of the doghouse? With all of the advice out there, relationships can get pretty complicated.

Alison Lenton and Marco Francesconi recently published an article in the in which they analyzed over 3,700 human dating decisions across 84 speed-dating events.

The authors found that when the available dates varied more in attributes such as age, height, occupation and educational background, people made fewer dating proposals.

To start, however, it is best to have a firm foundation in the simple and powerful steps that lead to relationship success.

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