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It is generally accepted that William Wallace was educated here.King Robert III (1390–1406) was buried in the Abbey.You can meet single seniors easily and discover a new, exciting world of new friendships and new companions.

It is often cited as "Scotland's largest town", as it does not have city status.

By the 19th century, Paisley was a centre of the weaving industry, giving its name to the Paisley shawl and the Paisley Pattern.

Pasilege (1182) and Paslie (1214) are recorded previous spellings of the name. Though Paisley lacks contemporary documentation it may have been, along with Glasgow and Govan, a major religious centre of the Kingdom of Strathclyde. The restored Abbey and adjacent 'Place' (palace), constructed out of part of the medieval claustral buildings, survive as a Church of Scotland parish church.

A priory was established in 1163 from the Cluniac priory at Wenlock in Shropshire, England at the behest of Walter fitz Alan, Steward of Scotland (d. One of Scotland's major religious houses, Paisley Abbey was much favoured by the Bruce and Stewart royal families.

major church), itself derived from the Greek βασιλική basilika.

However, some Scottish place-name books suggest "Pæssa's wood/clearing", from the Old English personal name Pæssa, "clearing", and leāh, "wood". A chapel is said to have been established by the 6th/7th century Irish monk, Saint Mirin at a site near a waterfall on the White Cart Water known as the Hammils.

His tomb has not survived, but that of Princess Marjorie Bruce (1296–1316), ancestor of the Stewarts, is one of Scotland's few royal monuments to survive the Reformation.

Paisley coalesced under James II's wish that the lands should become a single regality and, as a result, markets, trading and commerce began to flourish.

The town is on the northern edge of the Gleniffer Braes, straddling the banks of the White Cart Water, a tributary of the River Clyde.

The town became prominent in the 12th century, with the establishment of Paisley Abbey, an important religious hub which formerly had control over other local churches.

The Paisley witches, also known as the Bargarran witches or the Renfrewshire witches, were tried in Paisley in 1697.

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