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In 1611 King James Version, the first English translation of the Christian Bible Fornicated as an adjective is still used in botany, meaning "arched" or "bending over" (as in a leaf).

John Milton plays on the double meaning of the word in The Reason of Church-Government Urged against Prelaty (1642): "[She] gives up her body to a mercenary whordome under those fornicated [ar]ches which she cals Gods house." The Pauline epistles contain multiple condemnations of various forms of extramarital sex.

"Flee sexual immorality (porneia) and pursue self-control" (cf.

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I’ll use a post from Jim Wallace’s Cold Case Christianity blog to represent this argument. He wants to argue that legend couldn’t creep in over a few decades, so we can be confident that the gospels are an accurate biography of Jesus.

But he must argue that legend happen when given a few additional decades to justify why he can dismiss the Gospels of Thomas, of Judas, of the Ebionites, and others, many of them written in the late first or second centuries.

I must confess that the conservative calculations sound reasonable in parts.

This thinking places at least some of the gospels well before the fall of Jerusalem and the destruction of the temple in 70 CE.

By contrast, a teleological view interprets porneia, aselgeia and akatharsia in terms of the quality of the relationship (how well it reflects God's glory and Christian notions of a committed, virtuous relationship.) The debate also turns on the definition of the two Greek words moicheia (μοιχεία, adultery) and porneia (el:πορνεία, with meaning of prostitution, from which the word pornography is derived).

The first word is restricted to contexts involving sexual betrayal of a spouse; however, the second word is used as a generic term for illegitimate sexual activity, although many scholars hold that the Septuagint uses "porneia" to refer specifically to male temple prostitution.

He states that "the word 'fornication' has gone out of fashion and is not in common use to describe non-marital sex.

However, it is an excellent translation for porneia, which basically referred to any kind of sex outside of marriage ... but the overwhelming weight of scholarship and all the available evidence from the ancient world points firmly in this direction.

A deontological view of sex interprets porneia, aselgeia and akatharsia in terms of whether the couple are married or non-married.

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